Can YouTube Help A Student’s Online Reputation?

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Can YouTube Help A Student’s Online Reputation?

May 29, 2015

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Table of Contents

YouTube is an app and website that can provided endless entertainment. It can also be aplace for students to build their online reputation...if done right. Read the SmartSocial.com tips below for safety tips for teenagers on YouTube.

What is YouTube?

YouTube is  a free platform for watching and uploading videos.

Since YouTube is owned by Google, links to YouTube videos and YouTube channels are given priority in Google search
  • YouTube is owned by Google. If you have a Gmail and/or Google+ account it’s easy to create a YouTube account
  • Since YouTube is owned by Google, links to YouTube videos and YouTube channels are given priority in Google search results over other pages
  • YouTube has thousands of educational videos. You can learn about something new in a few minutes.

How can YouTube help a student’s online reputation?

Let me introduce you to our intern, Jamie. Jamie is 16 years old and she is applying to college soon. When Jamie first started working with us she had no online footprint, but she did have some very unique qualities that would help her stand out on a college application.  She can speak, read, and write in Mandarin.

YouTube improved Jamie’s Google results

When Jamie first started working with us she had almost no Google results under her name. When you would search for her name there used to be a lot of other people that would show up.

Now if you search for Jamie, you get a three-dimensional view of who she is. Her YouTube account comes up first. Next, her three videos that she posted. Then you will see her Google Plus account because it’s connected to YouTube and Google.

YouTube steps for success

When you are ready for an online footprint (and you must ask your parents first and make sure you are 13+ years old):

  1. Decide what subject you can teach (cooking, crafts, math, volunteering, language, programming, etc.)
  2. Have a friend use your phone to record you teaching the subject in a 60-90 second video
  3. Edit and upload the video in “unlisted” mode using the free YouTube app on your phone
  4. Rename the title of the video to include the subject and your full name. For example, Jamie named one of her videos: How to say “Hello” in Mandarin by Jamie”
  5. Once you get an approval from your parents, make the video “public”
  6. Then, when someone searches for your name on Google or YouTube, this video is likely to appear
It’s better if colleges find your real YouTube account, rather than accounts that belong to someone else

Consider creating a YouTube channel under your real name

(Only if you are 13+ years old and you get an approval from your parents.)

When colleges or employers search for students online, Google will usually display a YouTube link on the first page of results. So it’s better if they find your real account, rather than accounts that belong to someone else with a similar name.

More YouTube steps for success

  1. Set your YouTube username to your real name (to help Google find you). Example: Youtube.com/JoshOchs
  2. Link your profile to your Twitter, Instagram and other accounts
  3. Add the same clear, square photo of yourself that you use on other networks, so colleges and employers will know that they have found the right account.

Students can use YouTube to show their talents

  • Positive videos can turn a student’s Google results into a three dimensional version of their college resume
  • Colleges and future employers can see your uploaded videos and also videos you “liked,” channels you follow and comments you made. Go to YouTube.com/comments to see all comments people leave on your page and comments you wrote on other profiles
Colleges can see your uploaded videos and also videos you “liked,” channels you follow and comments you made.

YouTube Cons for young people

YouTube accounts are public. Anyone can see your account. You can manage video publicity settings:

  • Public - everyone can see (and search for the video)
  •  
  • Private - only owner and specific friends can watch them (while logged into Google)
  • Unlisted - only people, who have the link to the video can view that video

Teen safety from YouTube

Remember “The Grandma Rule”: Is what you’re posting something you’d want your grandmother to see?
  1. Children under 13 years are not permitted to set up a YouTube account.
  2. When filming videos of your friends, classmates, or other minors, remember that you should never be sexually suggestive, violent or dangerous.
  3. Remember “The Grandma Rule”: Is what you’re filming or posting something you’d want your grandmother, boss, future employer, parents, or future in-laws to see? Teen safety from YouTube
Parents: If your kids are under 13, please consider NOT allowing them to watch YouTube without adult supervision.

YouTube is not safe for students under 13

  1. Parents: If your students are under 13, please consider NOT allowing them to watch YouTube without adult supervision.
  2. Content on YouTube (and the internet in general) can be worse that what you would find on late night TV.
  3. Kids can easily find and watch adult videos while you are away.

YouTube is an app and website that can provided endless entertainment. It can also be aplace for students to build their online reputation...if done right. Read the SmartSocial.com tips below for safety tips for teenagers on YouTube.

What is YouTube?

YouTube is  a free platform for watching and uploading videos.

Since YouTube is owned by Google, links to YouTube videos and YouTube channels are given priority in Google search
  • YouTube is owned by Google. If you have a Gmail and/or Google+ account it’s easy to create a YouTube account
  • Since YouTube is owned by Google, links to YouTube videos and YouTube channels are given priority in Google search results over other pages
  • YouTube has thousands of educational videos. You can learn about something new in a few minutes.

How can YouTube help a student’s online reputation?

Let me introduce you to our intern, Jamie. Jamie is 16 years old and she is applying to college soon. When Jamie first started working with us she had no online footprint, but she did have some very unique qualities that would help her stand out on a college application.  She can speak, read, and write in Mandarin.

YouTube improved Jamie’s Google results

When Jamie first started working with us she had almost no Google results under her name. When you would search for her name there used to be a lot of other people that would show up.

Now if you search for Jamie, you get a three-dimensional view of who she is. Her YouTube account comes up first. Next, her three videos that she posted. Then you will see her Google Plus account because it’s connected to YouTube and Google.

YouTube steps for success

When you are ready for an online footprint (and you must ask your parents first and make sure you are 13+ years old):

  1. Decide what subject you can teach (cooking, crafts, math, volunteering, language, programming, etc.)
  2. Have a friend use your phone to record you teaching the subject in a 60-90 second video
  3. Edit and upload the video in “unlisted” mode using the free YouTube app on your phone
  4. Rename the title of the video to include the subject and your full name. For example, Jamie named one of her videos: How to say “Hello” in Mandarin by Jamie”
  5. Once you get an approval from your parents, make the video “public”
  6. Then, when someone searches for your name on Google or YouTube, this video is likely to appear
It’s better if colleges find your real YouTube account, rather than accounts that belong to someone else

Consider creating a YouTube channel under your real name

(Only if you are 13+ years old and you get an approval from your parents.)

When colleges or employers search for students online, Google will usually display a YouTube link on the first page of results. So it’s better if they find your real account, rather than accounts that belong to someone else with a similar name.

More YouTube steps for success

  1. Set your YouTube username to your real name (to help Google find you). Example: Youtube.com/JoshOchs
  2. Link your profile to your Twitter, Instagram and other accounts
  3. Add the same clear, square photo of yourself that you use on other networks, so colleges and employers will know that they have found the right account.

Students can use YouTube to show their talents

  • Positive videos can turn a student’s Google results into a three dimensional version of their college resume
  • Colleges and future employers can see your uploaded videos and also videos you “liked,” channels you follow and comments you made. Go to YouTube.com/comments to see all comments people leave on your page and comments you wrote on other profiles
Colleges can see your uploaded videos and also videos you “liked,” channels you follow and comments you made.

YouTube Cons for young people

YouTube accounts are public. Anyone can see your account. You can manage video publicity settings:

  • Public - everyone can see (and search for the video)
  •  
  • Private - only owner and specific friends can watch them (while logged into Google)
  • Unlisted - only people, who have the link to the video can view that video

Teen safety from YouTube

Remember “The Grandma Rule”: Is what you’re posting something you’d want your grandmother to see?
  1. Children under 13 years are not permitted to set up a YouTube account.
  2. When filming videos of your friends, classmates, or other minors, remember that you should never be sexually suggestive, violent or dangerous.
  3. Remember “The Grandma Rule”: Is what you’re filming or posting something you’d want your grandmother, boss, future employer, parents, or future in-laws to see? Teen safety from YouTube
Parents: If your kids are under 13, please consider NOT allowing them to watch YouTube without adult supervision.

YouTube is not safe for students under 13

  1. Parents: If your students are under 13, please consider NOT allowing them to watch YouTube without adult supervision.
  2. Content on YouTube (and the internet in general) can be worse that what you would find on late night TV.
  3. Kids can easily find and watch adult videos while you are away.

YouTube is an app and website that can provided endless entertainment. It can also be aplace for students to build their online reputation...if done right. Read the SmartSocial.com tips below for safety tips for teenagers on YouTube.

What is YouTube?

YouTube is  a free platform for watching and uploading videos.

Since YouTube is owned by Google, links to YouTube videos and YouTube channels are given priority in Google search
  • YouTube is owned by Google. If you have a Gmail and/or Google+ account it’s easy to create a YouTube account
  • Since YouTube is owned by Google, links to YouTube videos and YouTube channels are given priority in Google search results over other pages
  • YouTube has thousands of educational videos. You can learn about something new in a few minutes.

How can YouTube help a student’s online reputation?

Let me introduce you to our intern, Jamie. Jamie is 16 years old and she is applying to college soon. When Jamie first started working with us she had no online footprint, but she did have some very unique qualities that would help her stand out on a college application.  She can speak, read, and write in Mandarin.

YouTube improved Jamie’s Google results

When Jamie first started working with us she had almost no Google results under her name. When you would search for her name there used to be a lot of other people that would show up.

Now if you search for Jamie, you get a three-dimensional view of who she is. Her YouTube account comes up first. Next, her three videos that she posted. Then you will see her Google Plus account because it’s connected to YouTube and Google.

YouTube steps for success

When you are ready for an online footprint (and you must ask your parents first and make sure you are 13+ years old):

  1. Decide what subject you can teach (cooking, crafts, math, volunteering, language, programming, etc.)
  2. Have a friend use your phone to record you teaching the subject in a 60-90 second video
  3. Edit and upload the video in “unlisted” mode using the free YouTube app on your phone
  4. Rename the title of the video to include the subject and your full name. For example, Jamie named one of her videos: How to say “Hello” in Mandarin by Jamie”
  5. Once you get an approval from your parents, make the video “public”
  6. Then, when someone searches for your name on Google or YouTube, this video is likely to appear
It’s better if colleges find your real YouTube account, rather than accounts that belong to someone else

Consider creating a YouTube channel under your real name

(Only if you are 13+ years old and you get an approval from your parents.)

When colleges or employers search for students online, Google will usually display a YouTube link on the first page of results. So it’s better if they find your real account, rather than accounts that belong to someone else with a similar name.

More YouTube steps for success

  1. Set your YouTube username to your real name (to help Google find you). Example: Youtube.com/JoshOchs
  2. Link your profile to your Twitter, Instagram and other accounts
  3. Add the same clear, square photo of yourself that you use on other networks, so colleges and employers will know that they have found the right account.

Students can use YouTube to show their talents

  • Positive videos can turn a student’s Google results into a three dimensional version of their college resume
  • Colleges and future employers can see your uploaded videos and also videos you “liked,” channels you follow and comments you made. Go to YouTube.com/comments to see all comments people leave on your page and comments you wrote on other profiles
Colleges can see your uploaded videos and also videos you “liked,” channels you follow and comments you made.

YouTube Cons for young people

YouTube accounts are public. Anyone can see your account. You can manage video publicity settings:

  • Public - everyone can see (and search for the video)
  •  
  • Private - only owner and specific friends can watch them (while logged into Google)
  • Unlisted - only people, who have the link to the video can view that video

Teen safety from YouTube

Remember “The Grandma Rule”: Is what you’re posting something you’d want your grandmother to see?
  1. Children under 13 years are not permitted to set up a YouTube account.
  2. When filming videos of your friends, classmates, or other minors, remember that you should never be sexually suggestive, violent or dangerous.
  3. Remember “The Grandma Rule”: Is what you’re filming or posting something you’d want your grandmother, boss, future employer, parents, or future in-laws to see? Teen safety from YouTube
Parents: If your kids are under 13, please consider NOT allowing them to watch YouTube without adult supervision.

YouTube is not safe for students under 13

  1. Parents: If your students are under 13, please consider NOT allowing them to watch YouTube without adult supervision.
  2. Content on YouTube (and the internet in general) can be worse that what you would find on late night TV.
  3. Kids can easily find and watch adult videos while you are away.

YouTube is an app and website that can provided endless entertainment. It can also be aplace for students to build their online reputation...if done right. Read the SmartSocial.com tips below for safety tips for teenagers on YouTube.

What is YouTube?

YouTube is  a free platform for watching and uploading videos.

Since YouTube is owned by Google, links to YouTube videos and YouTube channels are given priority in Google search
  • YouTube is owned by Google. If you have a Gmail and/or Google+ account it’s easy to create a YouTube account
  • Since YouTube is owned by Google, links to YouTube videos and YouTube channels are given priority in Google search results over other pages
  • YouTube has thousands of educational videos. You can learn about something new in a few minutes.

How can YouTube help a student’s online reputation?

Let me introduce you to our intern, Jamie. Jamie is 16 years old and she is applying to college soon. When Jamie first started working with us she had no online footprint, but she did have some very unique qualities that would help her stand out on a college application.  She can speak, read, and write in Mandarin.

YouTube improved Jamie’s Google results

When Jamie first started working with us she had almost no Google results under her name. When you would search for her name there used to be a lot of other people that would show up.

Now if you search for Jamie, you get a three-dimensional view of who she is. Her YouTube account comes up first. Next, her three videos that she posted. Then you will see her Google Plus account because it’s connected to YouTube and Google.

YouTube steps for success

When you are ready for an online footprint (and you must ask your parents first and make sure you are 13+ years old):

  1. Decide what subject you can teach (cooking, crafts, math, volunteering, language, programming, etc.)
  2. Have a friend use your phone to record you teaching the subject in a 60-90 second video
  3. Edit and upload the video in “unlisted” mode using the free YouTube app on your phone
  4. Rename the title of the video to include the subject and your full name. For example, Jamie named one of her videos: How to say “Hello” in Mandarin by Jamie”
  5. Once you get an approval from your parents, make the video “public”
  6. Then, when someone searches for your name on Google or YouTube, this video is likely to appear
It’s better if colleges find your real YouTube account, rather than accounts that belong to someone else

Consider creating a YouTube channel under your real name

(Only if you are 13+ years old and you get an approval from your parents.)

When colleges or employers search for students online, Google will usually display a YouTube link on the first page of results. So it’s better if they find your real account, rather than accounts that belong to someone else with a similar name.

More YouTube steps for success

  1. Set your YouTube username to your real name (to help Google find you). Example: Youtube.com/JoshOchs
  2. Link your profile to your Twitter, Instagram and other accounts
  3. Add the same clear, square photo of yourself that you use on other networks, so colleges and employers will know that they have found the right account.

Students can use YouTube to show their talents

  • Positive videos can turn a student’s Google results into a three dimensional version of their college resume
  • Colleges and future employers can see your uploaded videos and also videos you “liked,” channels you follow and comments you made. Go to YouTube.com/comments to see all comments people leave on your page and comments you wrote on other profiles
Colleges can see your uploaded videos and also videos you “liked,” channels you follow and comments you made.

YouTube Cons for young people

YouTube accounts are public. Anyone can see your account. You can manage video publicity settings:

  • Public - everyone can see (and search for the video)
  •  
  • Private - only owner and specific friends can watch them (while logged into Google)
  • Unlisted - only people, who have the link to the video can view that video

Teen safety from YouTube

Remember “The Grandma Rule”: Is what you’re posting something you’d want your grandmother to see?
  1. Children under 13 years are not permitted to set up a YouTube account.
  2. When filming videos of your friends, classmates, or other minors, remember that you should never be sexually suggestive, violent or dangerous.
  3. Remember “The Grandma Rule”: Is what you’re filming or posting something you’d want your grandmother, boss, future employer, parents, or future in-laws to see? Teen safety from YouTube
Parents: If your kids are under 13, please consider NOT allowing them to watch YouTube without adult supervision.

YouTube is not safe for students under 13

  1. Parents: If your students are under 13, please consider NOT allowing them to watch YouTube without adult supervision.
  2. Content on YouTube (and the internet in general) can be worse that what you would find on late night TV.
  3. Kids can easily find and watch adult videos while you are away.

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